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Coronavirus (COVID-19)

COVID-19 Health Resources

Our goal with this page is to have clean and concise information for our community. We encourage you to visit all sections as most of the sections pertain to us all. 

Last Updated: 07/28/2020


Three documents from the COVID-19 Isolation Resource PDF are displayed in a fashion to show there are more than one page in the document. Documents shown include symptom and temperature log, mental health resources and Instructions for Living with Someone Who Has COVID-19 (Presumed or Confirmed) Illness.

Download the current Student Health Center COVID-19 Isolation Resource document, it includes:

  • 14-Day Symptom & Temperature Log
  • Instructions for Living with Someone Who Has COVID-19 (Presumed or Confirmed) Illness
  • Instructions for Home Care with COVID-19 (Presumed or Confirmed) Illness
  • Mental Health Support During Isolation/Quarantine
  • Texas State Community COVID-19 Resources

Student Health Center Updates:

Expand or Collapse all.
  • Student Health Center Operations Updates

    • The main Student Health Center and the Student Health Center in Round Rock will be open for the Summer semesters. Hours of operation for each location have been modified, see list below for hours. Services are by appointment only, please call 512.245.2161 to make an appointment.

      Hours:

      • Student Health Center & Pharmacy MWF 8 a.m.-5 p.m. & TTH 9a.m.-5p.m.
      • Student Health Center - Round Rock MWF 9 a.m.-12 p.m. (noon) & 1-5 p.m. & TTH Closed
      • Student Health Center - Thorpe Lane TMWF 7:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. & 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. & TTH 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. & 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
    • Services are by appointment only. Due to COVID-19, some services are temporarily only available via telehealth at the Student Health Center. This is not an exhaustive list and was updated 07/03/2020.

      Services Available:

      • Curbside Pharmacy (512.245.3590)
      • COVID-19 Testing (with an order from a Student Health Center medical provider)
      • In-Person:
        • Injuries (or Musculoskeletal pain)
        • Gynecology Problems
        • STI Screenings with Symptoms
        • Continuation of Depo-Provera
        • Male genital problem
        • Allergy Injections, Immunizations, TB Screenings
        • Physicals for programs
      • Telehealth
        • Birth Control Consultation or Problems
          • Contraception (Birth Control) Refills
        • Mental Health
        • Psychiatry (continuation and by referral only)
        • Refills of most chronic medication
        • Skin conditions
        • Headaches
        • STI screen without symptoms
        • UTI
    • Texas State faculty and staff are eligible for limited services at the Texas State Student Health Center and Pharmacy including:

      • Curbside Pharmacy (512.245.3590)
      • Immunizations or TB Testing

      Due to COVID-19, some services are temporarily available for Texas State University Faculty and Staff at the Student Health Center.

      Temporary Services Available:

      • COVID-19 Testing (with an order from a Student Health Center medical provider) 
        • Symptoms include Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Fever, Sore Throat, Chills, Body Aches, Vomiting/Diarrhea, New Loss of Smell or Taste, Headache, Runny Nose, Fatigue
      • Sick Visit
      • Telehealth

      This is not an exhaustive list and was updated 6/16/2020.

    • COVID-19 testing is available at the main Student Health Center for persons who meet our testing criteria. If you would like to be evaluated for testing, for COVID-19 at the Student Health Center, call the Student Health Center at 512.245.2161.

      You may be scheduled with a provider for a Telehealth visit to determine if you meet our criteria. When arriving for your test, please wait in your car and follow instructions when you are called.

    • Patients wishing to pick up prescriptions and over-the-counter medications can call 512.245.3590 to place an order. Arrive at your time slot, park in our patient parking lot and call 512.245.3590 to have their medicines walked out to them.

    • We will be screening all individuals upon arrival at all Student Health Center locations regardless for the reason for visit for:

      • Temperature Check
      • Symptoms: Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Sore Throat, Chills, Body Aches, Vomiting, Diarrhea, New Loss of Smell or Taste.

      All patients and staff will be wearing masks and face coverings in the building. Patients are asked to please bring a face covering to their visit. We require patients to wear a face covering that meets standards set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

      • Have at least two layers of material
      • Utilize at least one layer of a tightly woven material, such as: 
        • Nylon, Canvas, or Cotton (200+ thread count) 
        • Silk or synthetic silk (100% polyester, tight weave, not very stretchable) 
        • Chiffon (90% polyester, 10% spandex) 
        • Spandex  (52% nylon, 39% polyester, 9% spandex) 
      • Cover the nose and mouth completely
      • Fit snug against the sides of the face and chin with no gaps
      • Be secured with ties or elastic to prevent slipping

      Face coverings not allowed in the Student Health Center include: 

      • Neck gaiters and simple bandanas, as they are single layer material and do not fit snug to the mouth and nose 
      • Face coverings with exhaust valves
      • Scarves, which tend to be made of porous material

      For information on caring for your face covering view our Use of a Cloth Facemask PDF.

    • Pre-screening for all individuals upon arrival at all Student Health Center locations regardless for the reason for visit for:

      • Temperature Check
      • Symptoms: Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Sore Throat, Chills, Body Aches, Vomiting, Diarrhea, New Loss of Smell or Taste.

      Face coverings will be worn by all staff and patients in the building. Patients are asked to bring a face covering to their visit. For information on face covering recommendations view our Use of a Cloth Facemask PDF.

      Proper personal protective equipment (PPE) is being worn during in-person appointments.

      Increased disinfection and cleaning schedule for all clinics has been implemented.

      Telehealth and curbside visits are being provided to reduce the number of people in the buildings and in-person contact.


General Health During COVID-19:

  • How to Take Care of Yourself During the COVID-19 Situation

    • Protecting yourself and your family during a COVID-19 outbreak requires planning. Whether you live alone or with family or friends, talk about and make a plan. If you know of an elderly person that lives alone, reach out to them to offer assistance. Your preparedness plan should include at least the following:

      • Emergency contact numbers for family, friends, co-workers, and medical providers
      • Choose a room in the house, with a bathroom if possible, that can be used for isolating the sick
      • Familiarize yourself with precautions to take if caring for someone infected with COVID-19 by checking the CDC information at Precautions for Caregivers.
      • Plan for the care of pets if you are sick
      • Plan for managing childcare
      • Make sure you have a full month supply of medications you take regularly (May be available for purchase by curbside pick-up at the Student Health Center Pharmacy: Call 512.245.3590)
      • Make sure you have a thermometer at home (This is available for purchase by curbside pick-up at the Student Health Center Pharmacy: Call 512.245.3590)
      • Make sure you have over-the-counter medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), decongestant, cough suppressant (These are available for purchase by curbside pick-up at the Student Health Center Pharmacy: Call 512.245.3590)
      • Make your own cloth face mask (CDC Printable Tutorial)
      • Make sure you have disinfectant sprays or wipes, soap and laundry detergent
    • No vaccine is available to prevent COVID-19 infection at this time. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to someone infected with COVID-19. The CDC recommends following standard precautions for preventing respiratory diseases:

      • Avoid contact with persons who are sick
      • Stay home when you are sick
      • Use a cloth face covering to help slow the spread of COVID-19
      • Cover coughs and sneezes with tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash
      • Avoid touching your mouth, nose or eyes
      • Clean high touch surfaces at least daily with regular household disinfectant sprays or wipes
      • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, using the bathroom or before eating
        • Make your own poster for washing your hands on Wash Your Lyrics with your favorite song.
      • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available

      For more information on preventing the spread of COVID-19, check the CDC information at Preventing Spread of Coronavirus.

    • As studies continue on COVID-19, the CDC has found that a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (“asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (“pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity—for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms. In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

      Quality masks

      It is important that your face mask meets standards set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A quality face covering will:

      • Have at least two layers of material
      • Utilize at least one layer of a tightly woven material, such as: 
        • Nylon, Canvas, or Cotton (200+ thread count) 
        • Silk or synthetic silk (100% polyester, tight weave, not very stretchable) 
        • Chiffon (90% polyester, 10% spandex) 
        • Spandex (52% nylon, 39% polyester, 9% spandex) 
      • Cover the nose and mouth completely
      • Fit snug against the sides of the face and chin with no gaps
      • Be secured with ties or elastic to prevent slipping
      • Not make it difficult to breathe

      View the CDC recommendations about cloth face coverings

      Care & maintenance

      Launder your mask daily or rotate between at least two masks on alternating days.

      Face coverings that are not recommended: 

      • Neck gaiters and simple bandanas, as they are single layer material and do not fit snug to the mouth and nose 
      • Face coverings with exhaust valves
      • Scarves, which tend to be made of porous material
      • Face shields in most cases. (Face shields do not protect the wearer from aerosols containing the virus, and others from an infected wearer. Face shields are appropriate in situations where close contact with a potentially infected person may expose the wearer to respiratory droplets caused by speech, cough, or sneezing.)

      For more information on face coverings & masks at Texas State University, please visit the Face Coverings & Masks Webpage.

      For more information on preventing the spread of COVID-19, check the CDC information at Preventing Spread of Coronavirus.

    • COVID-19 - A chart where Y is the "Number of Cases", X is the "Duration of Time Since First Cases" and there is a horizontal cap for the "Capacity of Healthcare System." There are two curves. The First curve shows no prevention measures and spikes high quickly. The second curve shows prevention measures followed and falls within the Capacity of the U.S. Healthcare system.
      COVID-19 Curve Graph Adapted from the CDC

      “Flattening the curve” can be demonstrated by the graph above. With no interventions or prevention measures (ie. social distancing), the number of COVID-19 cases can exceed the healthcare system’s ability to manage them. This means that the healthcare system might run out of resources such as ventilators and healthcare workers that are needed to treat those infected. However, by taking preventative actions, we can “flatten the curve” to reduce the amount of cases occurring at one time. With cases spread out over time instead of occurring all at once, the healthcare system is less overwhelmed and more capable of providing care for those that are sick.

    • We expect long term changes due to COVID-19. This has disrupted our "normal" day-to-day activities, so we are now working on a "new normal."

      Here are some tips for developing a healthy routine for the “new normal”:

      • Schedule time for self-care.
        • This is a stressful time for many, so it is crucial to care for your mental health. The Counseling Center is offering telemental health visits as well as free Therapy Assistance Online (TAO). Visit the Counseling Center's website or the Minds Matter webpage for more mental health resources.
      • Schedule time for digital socialization.
        • Utilize programs such as FaceTime, Zoom, or Google Hangouts to connect with others even though physically apart. Talking with your support system is also good for maintaining mental health and relieving stress.
      • Schedule your studying like you would schedule a full-time job.
        • Maintaining a work-life balance is important. Use your Texas State Outlook calendar or a planner to schedule study times for each of your classes. Don’t forget to schedule in breaks.
      • Maintain a regular exercise schedule.
        • A complete exercise regimen includes aerobic activity, strength training and flexibility exercises. Aim for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity a week. Strength train each major muscle group at least 2 days a week and don’t forget to stretch. Try some at home with free workouts on YouTube or livestreams from the Campus Recreation's Fitness From Home. Waking up with exercise is also a great way to boost your alertness to help you get through your day of online classes. 
        • Sources:
      • Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day.
    • Top Recommendation: Order Curbside or Delivery

      1. Order Curbside or Delivery, if possible.
      2. Start an order.
        • Plan for the possibility of an item being out of stock, what's your alternative.
        • Don't plan on purchasing items that you don't plan on using or eating.
      3. When at the store minimize touching items, except for items you intend on purchasing. Allow for one person to pick up items at a time. When checking out, allow for 6ft between you and the other person in line. If applicable, stand behind the sneeze guard to protect the cashier.

      Secondary Option: Visit a Grocery Store

      1. Plan on making only one visit for at least two weeks, since the recommendation for self-isolation is 14 days (two weeks).
        • Plan on being the only individual to go to the grocery store. Do not take others.
      2. Prior to visiting the store make a plan including a list of groceries.
        • Check the store's app or webpage for changes to hours of operation, limits on purchases and availability of items at your local store.
        • List alternative options with the possibility of an item being out of stock.
        • Pack your own hand sanitizer and/or disinfection wipes.
      3. When at the store minimize touching items, except for items you intend on purchasing and wear a cloth face covering.
        • If utilizing a cart, disinfect the handle.
        • Follow directions on signage and markers in the store.
        • Respect individuals personal space and follow for social distancing standards of staying six feet apart from others.
        • Allow for one person at a time to pick up items.
      4. When checking out, allow for six feet between you and others in line.
        • If applicable, stand behind the sneeze guard to protect the cashier.
      5. When returning to your car, place groceries in a location that can be easily disinfected. If applicable, place the cart in the cart station and utilize sanitizer prior to entering your vehicle.
    • Gas stations are usually open and allow for air circulation. Although the risk of transmission from the pump is low, there are prevention recommendations. Follow social distancing recommendations through out your time at the gas station.

      1. Step out of your car with your cloth mask on and hand sanitizer. 
        • If available, put protective gloves on inside of the car and get your payment method ready. If no gloves, you can use paper towels as a barrier between your skin and the pump.
      2. Pay for your gas at the pump, refrain from entering the store front to pay.
      3. Choose your fuel type, pick up the pump and enter the nozzle into the gas tank opening.
      4. Begin fueling. On most pumps, you can lock the trigger to let the gas flow continuously and let go of the pump.
        • Wait outside of your car while your tank fills. Be sure not to touch anything, such as a cell phone, to limit the amount of items you need to sanitize.
      5. Once fueling is done, remove the gas pump and put it back.
      6. Recap your gas tank and close the door to the gas tank.
      7. In order to remove gloves safely, you will first grasp the outside cuff of one of the gloves. Then peel the glove off and grab the peeled off glove into the hand on the gloved hand. Make sure the removed glove is secured completely in the gloved hand (hence your gloved hand is closed shut and holding the removed glove). Then take the index finger of the un-gloved hand and slide it under the cuff of the gloved hand and peel it off. The glove with turn inside out and form a pouch that contains the soiled gloves. Throw the gloves away and immediately apply sanitizer.
      8. Take receipt if warranted and re-enter your vehicle.
      9. Upon arrival at next destination, wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water.
    • The Student Health Center is still offering mental health visits with a provider via Telehealth and in-person visits. Appointments can be made by calling 512.245.2161. Office hours are Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesday, Thursday from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

      The Counseling Center is offering phone consultations for scheduled appointments and crisis calls. The preferred method of contact is by calling 512.245.2208. If you need emergency support or want to initiate therapy, please call 512.245.2208. Office hours are Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

      The Counseling Center has also developed an extensive list of COVID-19 Mental Health Resources on their COVID-19 Resources website.

    • Texas State Campus Recreation
      The Texas State Student Recreation Center will be offering an abundance of free workout content on the Campus Recreation's Fitness From Home webpage. Workouts are offered on-demand and live via Zoom. Workout types include HIIT, TRX, Yoga, dance and more!

      Nike Training Club
      Nike has made all of its Nike Training Club Premium workouts free until further notice. The Nike Training Club workout library includes body-part focused workouts targeting your abs, arms, shoulders, glutes, and legs. Strength, endurance, yoga, and mobility workouts. Workout times range from 15-45 Minutes. Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced Levels at low, Moderate and High Intensities. Bodyweight only, Light and Full Equipment.

      Apple App Store Download Google Play Download

      Down Dog (Collection of Different Apps)
      Down Dog makes a handful of popular fitness services for iPhone and iPad, including apps for Yoga, HIIT, and more. To help people stay active and engaged during the coronavirus outbreak, Down Dog is has made their apps — Yoga, Yoga for Beginners, HIIT, Barre, and 7 Minute Workout — free.

      Apple App Store Download Google Play Download

      Planet Fitness
      Planet Fitness is encouraging people to remain active at home during the coronavirus pandemic through a series of live workouts. The classes will be streamed live on the Planet Fitness Facebook page every day at 4 p.m. CST The Planet Fitness app also offers hundreds of workouts that can be done from anywhere. These workouts are free for members and non-members.

      Apple App Store Download Google Play Download

      Pelaton
      Peloton is offering a 30-day free trial to its at-home workouts application. The in-app workouts don’t require owning any Peloton equipment, and includes yoga, HIIT, stretching, and other categories.

      Apple App Store Download Google Play Download
    • Cleaning & Disinfecting High Touch Area Chart

      Fillable PDF Excel Document

What To Do If You Are Sick:

  • What To Do If You Are Sick

    • Stay Home Except To Get Medical Care

      • Stay home: Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and are able to recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
      • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you have trouble breathing, or have any other emergency warning signs, or if you think it is an emergency.
      • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

      Home Isolation: Separate Yourself from Other People and Pets in your Home

      • Stay away from others: You should stay in a specific “sick room” if possible, and away from other people and pets in your home. Use a separate bathroom, if available.
    • Once you have tested positive, you will likely be asked to self-quarantine at home. Follow instructions from your healthcare provider and local health department. (Downloadable Version: Instructions for Home Care with COVID-19 (Presumed or Confirmed) Illness)

      • Monitor Your Symptoms:
        • See our Symptom & Temperature Log for help logging your symptoms and instructions on how to check your temperature.
          • If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:
            • Trouble breathing
            • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
            • New confusion or inability to arouse
            • Bluish lips or face
            • *This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

      • Wear a face covering
        • You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not stay in the same room with you, or they should wear a facemask if they enter your room.
      • Cover your coughs and sneezes.
        • ​​​​​​​Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.
    • While in isolation, you must stay away from others in one room-preferably with a private bathroom. If anyone enters your room, you must both wear a face mask. You should wear a face mask anytime you leave your room and might be around others. Any unnecessary interaction with others should be avoided while in isolation.

      While you are in isolation, it is very important for you to:

      • Stay home except to get medical care
      • Avoid public transportation, buses, ridesharing, or taxis
      • Separate yourself from other people and pets in your home
      • Avoid sharing items
      • Monitor your symptoms and fever (any temperature over 100 degrees F is a fever)
        • See our Symptom & Temperature Log for help logging your symptoms and instructions on how to check your temperature.
      • Cover your coughs and sneezes
      • Wear a cloth face covering if you must be around other people
      • Clean your hands and high-touch surfaces often

      Download the current Student Health Center COVID-19 Isolation Resource document for more information and helpful resources. The Isolation Resource includes:

      • 14-Day Symptom & Temperature Log
      • Instructions for Living with Someone Who Has COVID-19 (Presumed or Confirmed) Illness
      • Instructions for Home Care with COVID-19 (Presumed or Confirmed) Illness
      • Mental Health Support During Isolation/Quarantine
      • Texas State Community COVID-19 Resources

Frequently Asked Questions:

  • Coronavirus Facts

    • Coronaviruses are a family of RNA viruses that can infect humans and animals, including camels, cattle, cats and bats. Community-acquired coronaviruses are common and can cause colds, bronchitis and pneumonia.  Coronavirus infections are most frequent during the winter but can occur at any time of the year.  The infection is spread in humans primarily through direct contact with secretions or respiratory droplets in the air caused by coughing or sneezing. Some infection can be spread by touching contaminated surfaces. The COVID-19 incubation period ranges from 2-14 days with 5 days being most common. The most common symptoms of infection include fever, dry cough and feeling tired. However, some persons may experience runny nose, sinus congestion, sore throat, loss of sense of taste or smell and achiness early in the disease. According to the World Health Organization, the illness is mild in about 80% of infected persons, but about 14% will experience more serious illness and 5% will become critically ill. The risk for more severe complications increases in those 60 and older and persons with chronic medical problems such as diabetes, heart and lung disease and weakened immune systems. About 2% of those infected have died. Those infected may have mild symptoms during the first week, but then develop more serious problems during the second week. Currently, there is no medication that is approved for treatment of COVID-19. There is also no available vaccine. Most infected persons can care for themselves at home with over-the-counter medicines for fever, sinus congestion or cough.